Sneak peek at the big project! Matt is working hard and making progress.

Sneak peek at the big project! Matt is working hard and making progress.

I built this queen sized bed frame last March amid a flurry of pre-baby’s-arrival (Emmett) projects.  

Total cost approx. $125.

Kelly’s criteria: (1) replace a bare-bones steel bed frame that wasn’t attractive or stationary, (2) not make the top of the bed be too high, and (3) be solid.

Matt’s criteria: (1) give us more storage (underneath the bed), (2) cost less than an IKEA bed, and (3) not take too long to build (like <8 hours).

Materials: dimensional 4x6”, 2x4”, 1x4”, and 1x10” lumber; lag bolts, washers, various screws, framing nails, and finish nails; felt with adhesive (for underneath legs to prevent scratching the floor)

Tools: Framing nail gun/compressor (I also used a hammer which easily could have been used instead of the nail gun), compound saw, drill, and driver-drill

Key Features: component design for ease of assembly and possible dis-assembly; stout legs recessed from bed edge; **IMHO the legs/support system are slick.

—Matt

problemsolver:

The “Shopdog” from Woodshopdude.com  folds up quickly and takes minimal space.

Perhaps Matt would like to build this.

problemsolver:

The “Shopdog” from Woodshopdude.com  folds up quickly and takes minimal space.

Perhaps Matt would like to build this.

Tags: DIY carpentry

Soffits and electric outlets

Over the weekend, Matt was building our new soffits.  After several redesigns (on paper), he eventually decided to go with a simple design.  We’ll provide an update soon to show the completed result.  Or at least what we pass off as complete around here, which means fully functional but lacking finishing touches.  In the meantime, here are a few progress shots.

The plastic sheeting that has been serving as our temporary soffits (and seems to have done its main job of keeping animals from making their home in our attic) is finally gone!

Matt is pretty good about protecting himself from the sun when working outside.  He has been known to go shirtless once the sun is lower in the sky, but in the hours around noon, it’s long sleeves, a hat, and maybe even a t-shirt to protect his neck.

Meanwhile, I did a little bit of electrical work.  We had already run wire for a new circuit to our future tankless water heater, which will be installed on the south exterior wall of the house.  I decided to install an outlet on the inside of that wall to give the water heater ground fault protection.  I’m not sure whether it needs to be GFCI protected, but it seemed like a good idea since the water heater will be outside, and if it turns out to be a requirement, I don’t want to have not done it and find out when the inspector comes.  I looked at GFCI circuit breakers, but those things are about $50.  A regular breaker is only a few dollars, and a GFCI outlet is under $10, so I just couldn’t see spending that much money when I could get the same effect for so much cheaper.  A GFCI outlet protects the rest of the circuit that is downstream from it.  That’s why your kitchen might have a couple of GFCI outlets and the rest are regular.  Press the test button, and the rest of that circuit will turn off.  Kitchens have to have at least two circuits serving the outlets, so it probably will only turn off half the outlets, most likely along the same wall. 

I ended up installing a double outlet, mainly because I didn’t have on hand a single box that would attach to the side of a stud.  And can you really have too many outlets?  There is nothing else in this circuit.  Matt had already opened up the whole wall because some plumbing will need to be done in there for the water heater.  The inspector will want to see the connections in the box; the receptacles will be pushed into the box and covered with a plate later.

 

Then I covered it all up with copious amounts of painter’s tape, which I always do conscientiously ever since I once witnessed a spider come out of a hole we had cut in the wall.  Never again!  I also finally put a plate on the Cat-5 (ethernet) outlet we’d put in, oh almost two years ago and left hanging out of the wall with some more blue tape over it.  It took about one minute to put that plate on.  For shame.

I also replaced an old two-pronged outlet with a new three-pronged one, even though we haven’t upgrade the wiring to it yet, which means it is not grounded.  The old outlet was just loose and ugly.  The most annoying thing I’ve had to deal with in upgrading the electrical in this house is that someone painted over all the screws holding the outlets and switches to their boxes. 

Every time I need to remove one, it is really hard to get the screwdriver to bite on the screw.  I have tried scraping the paint out of the screw head with a razor blade, using an old chisel as a flathead screwdriver, and if I still can’t get a grip, sometimes I turn the screw with needle nosed pliers.  I don’t know where this tool came from or what its intended purpose is, but it worked pretty well for me this time.  If anyone knows what this is, please tell me.

I always label outlets as “not grounded” if they look grounded but aren’t - for safety and also to remind myself that a particular outlet still needs to be upgraded to new wiring.

We are making progress!  I am almost ready to have my electrical work inspected, and once that is done, we can have the water heater installed and finalize the installation of the fireplace insert.

-Kelly

Progress

I’m having trouble keeping the blog sync’d to real-time in the yard.  The fence has actually progressed to the point that I have the backyard fully enclosed, gates and all.  The only exception is the rabbit hole (not shown) for my pal and neighbor.  To fight my blogging lethargy, I’m hoping to make some blog progress by continuing to get some snippets up for ya.  Generally I want to have a full story to post but I’m realizing with all the demands on my time (work, play, watering the yard, entertaining great visitors) I have to go for good enough.

This photo shows some 2x4 sided reclaimed wood raised beds I built a few weekends ago in our backyard.  Also shown in the background is the opening for the “pi gate.”  I’m pretty stoked about the finished product (which I’ll have to show later).

I did the layout by eye.  I don’t recall using the tape measure at all and just scored the old wood with a pencil or razor blade and then went to town with the Skilsaw.

Ah, the dirt, I love the dirt.  A combo of chicken manure, steer manure, Cedar Grove compost, my compost, and about half dirt from the yard.  I just turned over the sod and applied the mix on top.   Atop the soil there is bean seed I’ve been saving each year since I got it back in 2006 and cucumber seed just before I poke them under the surface with my finger.

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The fence is happening

Our back yard is one of our favorite features of our house.  It’s a place for us to play, relax, garden, and chat with the neighbors.  We’ve been planning on putting up a nice, secure fence.  It will give us privacy and block views of the foundations of our neighbors’ houses while replacing it with a nice view of plants growing up the sides and on a trellis on top.  It will give us a secure place for future additions to the family (possible order of new family members over the next few years: dog 1, dog 2, child 1, chickens 1-3, child 2).  Over the last few weeks, Matt has been planning, buying materials, and digging holes.  Yesterday, our very skilled and incredibly generous neighbor, Robert, worked all day with Matt to carefully set the fence posts and rails.  I’m so excited to see the progress! 

This is what the back yard looked like a few weeks ago:

Here’s what it looked like two days ago:

Here’s what it looked like yesterday:

[Don’t worry, these posts weren’t set yet; they were just dropped into the holes and were later plumbed and the holes filled with concrete or gravel.]

Matt will fill you in on the details of planning and building the fence.  He’s pretty busy these days with the fence project, school, and work.

A few weeks ago, we installed a new front door.  The old one was pretty terrible &#8212; hollow core, water-stained, and drab brown.  I think the new one really brightens up the entry way.  This was our first door installation and it took us most of a Saturday and part of Sunday.  Our next door neighbor is a carpenter, and he generously provided some advice, use of his table saw, and an extra set of hands from time to time.  We kind of knew what we were doing thanks to several books from the library, but there&#8217;s no substitute for experience.  Thanks, Robert!

We love the light let in by the stained-glass window at the top, the reduction in sound and air coming into the house, and the new dead-bolt.  This was high up on my priority list for home improvement projects, and I&#8217;m really glad we got it done (well, functionally done anyway, with interior trim &amp; paint to come).  The door plus the other supplies needed were under $400, DIY installation = free, and we should be able to get 30% of the price of the door itself in tax credits because it is energy efficient.  Sweet!

Foamy!  I later trimmed off the excess foam, which makes it look a lot neater.  We still need to put the trim on (inside only) and paint the inside of the door, as it got a little dinged in the installation process.  The brick moulding came primed, but we need to paint it.
-Kelly

A few weeks ago, we installed a new front door.  The old one was pretty terrible — hollow core, water-stained, and drab brown.  I think the new one really brightens up the entry way.  This was our first door installation and it took us most of a Saturday and part of Sunday.  Our next door neighbor is a carpenter, and he generously provided some advice, use of his table saw, and an extra set of hands from time to time.  We kind of knew what we were doing thanks to several books from the library, but there’s no substitute for experience.  Thanks, Robert!

We love the light let in by the stained-glass window at the top, the reduction in sound and air coming into the house, and the new dead-bolt.  This was high up on my priority list for home improvement projects, and I’m really glad we got it done (well, functionally done anyway, with interior trim & paint to come).  The door plus the other supplies needed were under $400, DIY installation = free, and we should be able to get 30% of the price of the door itself in tax credits because it is energy efficient.  Sweet!

Foamy!  I later trimmed off the excess foam, which makes it look a lot neater.  We still need to put the trim on (inside only) and paint the inside of the door, as it got a little dinged in the installation process.  The brick moulding came primed, but we need to paint it.

-Kelly